September 25th, 2015 by Abhijit Chakraborty admin

 

We recently caught up with noted travel photographer Amos Chapple who stayed with us at an OYO in Jaipur. Amos is a photographer from New Zealand and has been published in major news titles around the world. Having travelled in 67 countries, Amos’ camera has captured many beautiful images. Sample these pictures clicked from the sky (all images are the intellectual property of Amos Chapple).

 

Taj Mahal as the day's first tourists trickle through the gates.
Taj Mahal as the day’s first tourists trickle through the gates.

 

The Lotus Temple, dotted with pigeons at sunrise. Designed by an Iranian exile, the building serves as the centre of the Bahai'i faith in Delhi.
The Lotus Temple, dotted with pigeons at sunrise. Designed by an Iranian exile, the building serves as the centre of the Bahai’i faith in Delhi.

 

Jama Masjid - The red sandstone structure was built under the orders of the same Mughal emporer of Taj Mahal fame.
Jama Masjid – The red sandstone structure was built under the orders of the same Mughal emperor of Taj Mahal fame.

 

We asked Amos about his work and experiences, and here is what he had to say.

 

Q. Please tell us the story behind these fascinating images and your starting point as a photographer?

The aerial work dates back to 2012-2013. I was literally checking every week or so for a quadcopter that was going to enable aerial photography, It had had always been a kind of fantasy that one day this would be possible. By 2013, these half-baked companies would pop up then disappear but you could feel the breakthrough was getting closer. When DJI came out with their first Phantom I headed straight to London to pick one up.

My first camera flight was in Latvia. I strapped a little point & shoot onto the drone then lofted it nervously about 15 metres in the air. When I unhooked the camera and looked at the pics I remember thinking “this changes everything.” In terms of photography hardware, we’re probably not going to have another moment like that in our lifetimes.

Q. As a photographer what is the most important aspect of photographer for you?

Emotion, everything else in an image is peripheral. In aerial photography, emotion can be very difficult to convey but occasionally the weather will gift something that lifts an image above the bright, blue-skied postcard shot.

Q. What is your average day like? Do you follow any set routine?

It’s a pretty odd one! I shoot in the mornings & evenings so I’m up at 5 am, then shooting from sunrise until about 9 am, then I grab breakfast and edit. I’ll usually sneak in a siesta in the middle of the day then head out to shoot from around three until sunset. Dinner is the time when I make sure to relax – I always leave the laptop behind and just take a book to the restaurant. After dinner, I edit the evening shots and back them up onto two hard drives then head to bed around ten or eleven.

Q. What are your tips for budding photographers?

Whatever sets you apart as a person sets you apart as a photographer. Maybe you’re good at climbing mountains, maybe you speak an obscure language. Whatever your point of difference is as a person, make the most of that in your photography.

You can check out more of his work on his website.

And here is what Amos had to say about his stay at OYO Rooms Flute Boutique in Jaipur –

“… it’s lovely, exactly what we needed after a long, dusty journey…”

 

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You can book your OYO in Jaipur by visiting this link.

 

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